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Posts Tagged ‘gluten intolerance’

Yummy recipe!!!

peanut butter chocolate brownies + facts about non-wheat flour [5 ingredients | simple baking].

We have tons of gluten free flours for those of us with Celiac or gluten intolerance.

You know what to do: 208-522-6964 or visit us at 159 S. Corner Ave, Idaho Falls

❤ Sarah

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[tweetmeme source=”your_twitter_name” only_single=false http://www.URL.com] I wrote a post a little while ago about food allergies that became quite popular.  So I thought I’d do a couple of follow up posts on specific common food allergies.  How’s that grab ya? Today let’s focus on Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance. 

According to Dictionary.com Celiac Disease is:

–noun
 a hereditary digestive disorder involving intolerance to gluten, usually occurring in young children, characterized by marked abdominal distention, malnutrition, wasting, and the passage of large, fatty, malodorous stools.
Ok, so the last part of that was pretty yicky, but it’s one sign to look for when considering whether or not you may have Celiac Disease.  Here in the store, a majority of our customers with Celiac complain of intense stomach pain.  Oh, and most of them are not children.  Sorry Dictionary.com!  Celiac sufferers complain that everything they eat makes them sick.  Wanna know why?  Because wheat or other grains containing gluten are used in almost everything that is commercially available.  All those yummy snacks at the grocery store are lurking and waiting to attack your guts like evil ninjas!

Overcoming Celiac and Gluten Intolerance is a hard hill to climb but it can be done.  It takes lots of will power and a little creativity.  The first step is to do research and see what foods are ok to eat.  The Celiac Sprue Association has a fantastic list of grains that are safe to ingest.  Here’s a short sample:

 
Consistent with a gluten-free diet at this time. Questionable due to content, contact, or contamination. NOT CONSISTENT WITH A GLUTEN-FREE DIET AT THIS TIME.
 
 
acorn [Quercus spp.] Sweet edible nut used whole or ground into flour. Flour adds flavor and fiber, but does not bind well.

almond [Prunus amygdalus] Sweet edible nut used whole or ground into flour. This flour, alone or in combination with other flours, is used in breads, cakes and pastries.

amaranth [Amaranthaceae] Many varieties; related to spinach, beets and pigweed. Tiny seeds are commercially available whole, or ground into a light brown flour with a nutty taste. Highly nutritious. Edible leaves.

arborio rice Short-grain white rice of Northern Italy used for risotto. Cooks up creamy. Similar to the California-grown short-grain variety, pearl.

aromatic rice Brown or white rice with a natural aroma and flavor similar to roasted nuts or popcorn.

arrowroot [Maranta arundinacea] Herbaceous tropical perennial. The starch, extracted from the rhizomes, is used as a thickener and blends well with gluten-free flours. Interchangeable with cornstarch.

artichoke [Cynara scolymus] Flower head of a thistle-like plant. Used cooked as a vegetable, or dried and ground into flour. Combine flour with rice, potato, and/or tapioca flour for breads and other baked goods.

BARLEY [Hordeum vulgare] The offending storage protein [prolamin] is known as hordein. BARLEY is present in many commercial products as malt, flavorings, colorings, and/or flavor enhancers. May be a part of hydrolyzed plant protein [HPP] or hydrolyzed vegetable protein [HVP].

basmati rice Very slender, long-grain, highly aromatic rice grown in India and Pakistan. High in flavor; available in brown and white forms.

beans Seeds of leguminous plants. Used whole as a cooked vegetable; pureed as a thickener, or dried and ground into flour. Many commercial gluten-free bean flours are available. (See legumes.)

besan (gram, chickpea flour) Pale yellow flour made from ground, dried chickpeas; very nutritious, high in protein. Used in doughs, dumplings, and noodles; as a thickener for sauces; and as a batter for deep fried food.

black and red rice Rare Asian rice grains with black and red husks and bran coverings. (Also cultivated in California.)

boil-in-bag rice Rice that is pre-measured, cooked, and packaged in a colander-style plastic bag for quick, convenient cooking.

bran (WHEAT, RYE, OAT, corn, rice) The meal derived from the epidermis layer or outer covering of a cereal grain.

brewer’s rice Tiny particles of rice or rice chips, primarily used as an ingredient in brewing beer or in animal feed.

brown rice Kernels of rice from which only the hull has been removed. Cooked brown rice has a slightly chewy texture and a nut-like flavor.

brown rice flour Ground form of brown rice with a nutty taste.

 buckwheat [Fagopyrum esculentum] Herb with triangular-shaped seed and black shell, used whole, cracked or ground into flour.

For the full list and some recipies, check out the CSA website. 

*A note on oats: many companies are marketing oats as a gluten-free alternative to wheat.  Oats are not gluten-free! The FDA has a point scale for foods containing gluten and many oats are genetically modified to fall under the “Gluten-free” category on the scale. So if you’re wondering why oats are causing you problems, there you have it!  Also, depending on the severity of your gluten intolerance, you may or may not be able to eat soy, hemp or sprouted grain breads.

Those of you who are suffering from Celiac and think that it’s ok to just keep suffering, think again!  If left untreated, Celiac can lead to all sorts of nasty intestinal problems like IBS or Crohn’s Disease.  Which means that you won’t get any nutrients from any food that you eat.  So if you think you might be gluten intolerant, jump up from the computer and make an appointment with your nearest N.D. (naturopathic doctor) or M.D (if you must) to get tested and discuss your options.  It’s your health.

If you are needing to stock up your pantry with gluten-free flours and grains, we have a fabulous variety here at the store, with brands like Bob’s Redmill, Guistos and Arrowhead Mills.

You know what to do: 208-522-6964 or 159 S. Corner Ave. Idaho Falls

❤ Sarah

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